Source Questions

http://money.cnn.com/2012/07/10/news/economy/olympic-athletes-financial/index.htm

The author is Charles Riley, not much is known besides the fact he writes frequent          articles for CNN money. The genre of the article is a website, specifically CNN. CNN is usually a credible source, it can be considered  “liberally” biased. The audience the article addresses can range from an avid sports follower or a person interested in what was the upcoming London Olympics. It is current, written slightly before the summer Olympics. The scope of the text is narrow and informative. It offers first-hand information from athletes that have struggles financially because of their sports. Most of the article focuses on the financial struggles athletes face. I think the author’s goal was to bring forth an issue no one would assume occurs. Most people assume because an athlete is an Olympian they are well off in life. At the end of the article, the authors brings forth the point that the athletes don’t really benefit but instead the businesses. The text omitted information on how athletes do benefit and long those benefits last. Information from the text is received from athletes themselves.

Sources!

Nash, June. Mayan Visions. New York: Routledge. 2001

1.) The author is June Nash, and I have no previous knowledge of any of her books.

2.) The genre of the piece is a book.

3.) The publication is Routledge, yet I do not know anything about the publisher.

4.) The audience the author is addressing is anyone who is interested in the theories of the Mayan prophecies. Generally speaking, it might be aimed toward scientists.

5.) The text is fairly current. It was published 11 years ago. It is younger than other but not newer.

6.) The scope of the text is one sided because its primarily talking about the theories and prophecies of the Mayan’s theories.

7.) The goal in writing this book was to provide a declaratory statements of the theories of the Mayan visions.

8.) What could be omitted is the way the Mayans’ lived because I feel that when discussing the theories there does not need to be details about how they lived.

9.) The author uses texts from other sources such as newspapers. Newspapers that talk about outbreaks in discoveries in the “doomsday theories.” The sources seem very credible because they are published newspaper articles.

Source of Info Questions

1) Who is the author and how much do you know about him/her?  Credentials, affiliations, background, etc?

– Scott Steinberg, High-tech parenting writer, a professional keynote speaker and business consultant

2)    What is the genre of the piece? (website, magazine, newspaper, scholarly journal, book, interview, etc)

– Website Article. Has excerpts from the book by the author.

3)    What do you know about the publication, organization, sponsor, etc?  What kind of reputation or bias might be involved?

– The article leans towards benefits of video games but that is simply because that is what it is about and is independent of ABC news.

4)    What audience is the author addressing?

– Parents, Families or those naïve to the benefits of gaming.

5)    How current is the text?  (And how much does currency matter for the particular topic?)

– It comes from 2011 but although games have changed since then, the principle of gaming and the overall impact have remained the same so currency is not really an issue.

6)    What is the scope of the text? (Broad, narrow, focused on 1 argument or multi-sided, informative, etc)

– The article focuses almost exclusively on benefits.

7)    What are the author’s probable goal and bias in writing the piece?

– The author’s goal is probably to educate others on the benefit of video games and focus away from the negatives.

8)    What might be omitted or censored from the text?

– I don’t think anything in the text was censored or omitted.

9)    What kinds of sources/evidence does the author use and how credible/reliable do those sources seem?

– Uses actual examples from various popular video games and statistics from credible associations.

Questions Specifically for Web Sites:

1)    Does the site actually provide the author or sponsor and their credentials/affiliations?  (If not, they might not be reliable)

– It provides excerpted information by the author from his book and information on who he is.

2)    Does the site provide contact information for the author or sponsor?

– It provides a link to his book and contact to ABC news.

3)    Are the sources of information/evidence cited?  Can you tell if the information is original or if it was taken from somewhere else?

– The information and statistics are taken from various sources such as sites, journals, and professionals however there is no external link to any of these sources.

4)    Are dates included on the web site?  And do these dates correspond to the material itself or only to when the material was placed on the site?

– The dates of the statistics and examples are usually within a year of the when the article was added.

Source

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/thisweek/2009/03/16_napin.asp

1. The authors is credible due to having the article written in the UCSD and has a source of a sleep research expert.

2. The article is based off of a website. And specifically talks about the pros of napping.

3. I do not believe that there would be any bias in this article due to the article coming from a school with no real affiliation.

4. The article targets students at UCSD.

5. The text is not current but that does not matter for this topic because it is not as subject to change as much as other subjects of matter.

6. The text is more informative than anything because there is no argument. The only thing that the text might be telling the reader to do is actually sleep more or take more naps.

7. The authors goal is probably to have students at UCSD sleep or nap more to receive better grades and give UCSD a higher standing among the other universities.

8. The negative effects of napping may have been omitted because the main point of the article is to have students nap more instead of staying up all day.

9. The author gives out experimental data collected by a UCSD researcher who specifically deals with sleep.

1. The site does provide the credentials of the sponsor and affiliations towards the school.

2. The site does not give out contact information of the author or sponsor.

3. Yes the quotes are cited.

4. Dates are included on the website but the date is only pertaining to the time the article was placed on the website.

Source Credibility

http://www.businessweek.com/authors/2027-peter-coy

1) Who is the author and how much do you know about him/her?  Credentials, affiliations, background, etc?

Peter Coy is an economics editor for Bloomsberg Businessweek. He was a business news writer for the Associated Press in New York before. He has a B.A. in History from Cornell.

2)    What is the genre of the piece? (website, magazine, newspaper, scholarly journal, book, interview, etc)

It is a news website.

3)    What do you know about the publication, organization, sponsor, etc?  What kind of reputation or bias might be involved?

It’s really geared towards economics and business aspect of the world.

4)    What audience is the author addressing?

Peter Coy addresses student loans and shows many examples of students that are stuck with debt for the rest of their lives.

5)    How current is the text?  (And how much does currency matter for the particular topic?)

It was written September 18, 2012. It’s very relevant.

6)    What is the scope of the text? (Broad, narrow, focused on 1 argument or multi-sided, informative, etc)

It’s very informative. It focuses more on the students rather than the agencies that give out loans.

7)    What are the author’s probable goal and bias in writing the piece?

Peter Coy is geared towards informing students of the future issues that may occur with taking out a student loan in order to further your education. While he gives some positive aspects, he really mostly highlights the scary and hidden factors of student loans.

8)    What might be omitted or censored from the text?

He doesn’t really go on to tell the people that were able to get out of debt as adults. He shows the negative side of it rather than shining light on some positive.

9)    What kinds of sources/evidence does the author use and how credible/reliable do those sources seem?

He uses a lot of statistical evidence which were all cited. He also goes along to use real life example of students or adults suffering the consequences of student loans.

 

Questions Specifically for Web Sites:

1)    Does the site actually provide the author or sponsor and their credentials/affiliations?  (If not, they might not be reliable)

Yes, at the top and bottom of the article.

2)    Does the site provide contact information for the author or sponsor?

Yes, they do.

3)    Are the sources of information/evidence cited?  Can you tell if the information is original or if it was taken from somewhere else?

Yes, they are. It was probably taken from another business magazine or website since he used many examples of statistics.

4)    Are dates included on the web site?  And do these dates correspond to the material itself or only to when the material was placed on the site?

Yes they are. It corresponds well with the material.

source thingy

Pychyl, Timothy A. “Don’t Delay.” Fear of Failure. Psychology Today, 13 Feb. 2009. Web. 12 Nov. 2012. <http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/dont-delay/200902/fear-failure>.

1)    Who is the author and how much do you know about him/her?  Credentials, affiliations, background, etc?

The author is Timothy Pychyl. I don’t know him personally. He is a PHD and a professor in psychology.

2) What is the genre of the piece? (website, magazine, newspaper, scholarly journal, book, interview, etc)

The website’s genre is about procrastination.

3)    What do you know about the publication, organization, sponsor, etc?  What kind of reputation or bias might be involved?

The publisher is by Psychology Today. I doubt they’ll provide biasm, as the site doesn’t have any affliation — it’s just plain information about research.

4)    What audience is the author addressing?

Mr. Pychyl

5)    How current is the text?  (And how much does currency matter for the particular topic?)

This topic is about 3 – 4 years old. I doubt the date will make any difference.

6)    What is the scope of the text? (Broad, narrow, focused on 1 argument or multi-sided, informative, etc)

The article is a bit narrow, as it focuses more on fear of failure.

7)    What are the author’s probable goal and bias in writing the piece?

To inform others about how fear of failure can be a root to procrastination.

8)    What might be omitted or censored from the text?

I don’t think any would be omitted as it is merely unbiased.

9)    What kinds of sources/evidence does the author use and how credible/reliable do those sources seem?

He uses several books, however most of them were written by the same person.

Questions Specifically for Web Sites:

1)    Does the site actually provide the author or sponsor and their credentials/affiliations?  (If not, they might not be reliable)

Yes.

2)    Does the site provide contact information for the author or sponsor?

No.

3)    Are the sources of information/evidence cited?  Can you tell if the information is original or if it was taken from somewhere else?

The doctor wrote the summary himself.

4)    Are dates included on the web site?  And do these dates correspond to the material itself or only to when the material was placed on the site?

There are dates. No, the dates are irrelevant to the matter.

Source Credibility Questions

Terlecki, Melissa, Jennifer Brown, Lindsey Harner-Steciw, John Irvin-Hannum, Nora Marchetto-Ryan, Linda Ruhl, and Jennifer Wiggins. “Sex Differences and Similarities in Video Game Experience, Preferences, and Self-Efficacy: Implications for the Gaming Industry.” EBSCO, 1 Dec. 2010. Web. 11 Nov. 2012

1)    Who is the author and how much do you know about him/her?  Credentials, affiliations, background, etc? Melissa Terlecki is a professor from the Psychology Department at Cabrini College. The other authors are also affiliated with Cabrini College.

2)    What is the genre of the piece? (website, magazine, newspaper, scholarly journal, book, interview, etc) Article.

3)    What do you know about the publication, organization, sponsor, etc?  What kind of reputation or bias might be involved? The publication company Spring Science have a lot of credibility because of their 170 years of publishing and the organization of their business and website.

4)    What audience is the author addressing? Males since the article suggests that sex differences exist, favoring males.

5)    How current is the text?  (And how much does currency matter for the particular topic?) Seeing that it was published in 2010, it has some significance, but the exponential growth of female gamers makes the gap of the past two years a big deal.

6)    What is the scope of the text? (Broad, narrow, focused on 1 argument or multi-sided, informative, etc) It’s informative focusing on many narrow topics.

7)    What are the author’s probable goal and bias in writing the piece? To inform the readers. The article is full of statistics and studies of male/female gamers.

8)    What might be omitted or censored from the text? Some sexual discrimination that may make the article politically incorrect.

9)    What kinds of sources/evidence does the author use and how credible/reliable do those sources seem? Many sources and evidence were used, including article excerpts from books, magazines, and websites.

Plummer, Victoria. “5 Effects of Sleep Deprivation”. Discovery: Fit and Health. 2009. Web. 11 Nov. 2012.

1)    Who is the author and how much do you know about him/her?  Credentials, affiliations, background, etc?  Victoria Plummer is a writer for Discovery but that’s it.

2)    What is the genre of the piece? (website, magazine, newspaper, scholarly journal, book, interview, etc) Online Article

3)    What do you know about the publication, organization, sponsor, etc?  What kind of reputation or bias might be involved? Discovery is a widely known and appreciated source about the world and its inhabitants.  Its reputation is that its information is never incorrect and always worth knowing.

4)    What audience is the author addressing? The audience that the author is addressing is any person.. Everyone needs to know as much about sleep as the person next to them because we all must do it.

5)    How current is the text?  (And how much does currency matter for the particular topic?) The text was written less than four years ago so it is very current.  Currncy has nothing to do with the topic.

6)    What is the scope of the text? (Broad, narrow, focused on 1 argument or multi-sided, informative, etc) The scope of the text is absolutely informative.

7)    What are the author’s probable goal and bias in writing the piece? The author’s goal of the writing seems to be to to help others identify sleep deprivation by explaining its symptoms and how to deal with each.

8)    What might be omitted or censored from the text? Nothing could be omitted or censored because every part is viable information which completes the purpose of the article.

9)    What kinds of sources/evidence does the author use and how credible/reliable do those sources seem?  The author gains her evidence from her employer, How Stuff Works, which contains a vast amount of facts and information.

Source Credibility

Benson, Jonathan. “Social Media Addiction Can Ruin Your Health”. Natural News. 28 September 2010. Web. 11 August 2012

1)    Who is the author and how much do you know about him/her?  Credentials, affiliations, background, etc?

Jonathan Benson is a staff writer at Natural News.com

2)    What is the genre of the piece? (website, magazine, newspaper, scholarly journal, book, interview, etc)

Website

3)    What do you know about the publication, organization, sponsor, etc?  What kind of reputation or bias might be involved?

Natural News.com reports on different health concerns that occur around the country.

4)    What audience is the author addressing?

He is addressing to those who might be addicted to social networking sites.

5)    How current is the text?  (And how much does currency matter for the particular topic?)

September 28, 2010. The currency doesn’t matter that much because it’s still pretty recent and social networking hasn’t changed that much.

6)    What is the scope of the text? (Broad, narrow, focused on 1 argument or multi-sided, informative, etc)

This article is narrow and informative, focusing on how students take up so much time using social media.

7)    What are the author’s probable goal and bias in writing the piece?

To inform that students are too addicted to updating their social networking sites and that it is ruining their health.

8)    What might be omitted or censored from the text?

They didn’t didn’t specify the times the students spent on the social networking sites or different ways to manage time.

9)    What kinds of sources/evidence does the author use and how credible/reliable do those sources seem?

They used Fox News

Questions Specifically for Web Sites:

1)    Does the site actually provide the author or sponsor and their credentials/affiliations?  (If not, they might not be reliable)

Yes

2)    Does the site provide contact information for the author or sponsor?

Yes

3)    Are the sources of information/evidence cited?  Can you tell if the information is original or if it was taken from somewhere else?

Information was taken from another news source.

4)    Are dates included on the web site?  And do these dates correspond to the material itself or only to when the material was placed on the site?

Yes.

Source Credibility Answers

Krumhansl, Carol L. “Music: A Link between Cognition and Emotion”. Current Directions in  Psychological Science. Vol. 11, No. 2 (April 2002): 45-50. JSTOR. Web. 11 Nov. 2012.

1)    Who is the author and how much do you know about him/her?  Credentials, affiliations, background, etc? Carol L. Krumhansl is a professor from the department of Psychology at Cornell University in New York. 

2)    What is the genre of the piece? (website, magazine, newspaper, scholarly journal, book, interview, etc) Scholarly Journal

3)    What do you know about the publication, organization, sponsor, etc?  What kind of reputation or bias might be involved? SAGE has helped inform and educate practitioners, researchers, and students in a wide range of subject since 1965. It’s known as the world’s leading independent academic and professional publisher.

4)    What audience is the author addressing? Anyone who listens to music since she explains the psychological responses of people as they listen to certain types of music.

5)    How current is the text?  (And how much does currency matter for the particular topic?) April 2002;The currency would not matter due to the fact that we listen to certain types of music which would affect the way we think when we listen to ballads, rock music, or classical music.

6)    What is the scope of the text? (Broad, narrow, focused on 1 argument or multi-sided, informative, etc) It is a narrow, informative journal with an argument on how music has the power to affect our emotions.

7)    What are the author’s probable goal and bias in writing the piece? To explain how music can affect people in such a way that we have would have emotional effect just from listening to music.

8)    What might be omitted or censored from the text? How music may have a probability of not affecting our emotions as we listen to music.

9)    What kinds of sources/evidence does the author use and how credible/reliable do those sources seem? She uses support from the studies of Hevner (1936) who had listeners to choose emotional adjectives for instrumental selections. This is reliable because Hevner’s experiment demonstrated the relation of musical structure and the mood of the music.